Bible Study

Pressure Points – 2017 WLI National Conference – Milwaukee, WI

Pressure Points
September 29 9:00am - 3:00pm
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
$99 general public / $35 undergrads

HOTEL INFORMATION

The WLI 2017 National Conference is located inside the Hyatt Regency Milwaukee.  For your convenience, we have secured a block rate for king and double queen rooms at the Hyatt Regency Milwaukee.  Book your room(s) early to ensure you are included in this block rate.  Rooms are $119.00 a night,  $20.00 for each additional person per room.  Included with reservation is one breakfast voucher for each paid guest to be used in the Bistro 333 in the lobby.  Hotel guests will be responsible for parking fees. The cutoff date for reserving a block rate room is August 29, 2017.

Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
333 West Kilbourn Avenue
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, 53203
Website: https://aws.passkey.com/go/Concordia2017
Phone: 1-888-421-1442

 

Designed for both men and women Christian professionals and college students, the Pressure Points event will tackle four topics where workplace expectations and responsibilities can create pressure points.   Four experienced speakers will share their personal journeys of being a Christian professional in corporate and public life and share tips for navigating the grey areas when Christian values and workplace expectations don’t always reconcile.   Each topic will be followed by reflection time, interactive table discussions with like-minded professionals, and online discussion boards for further connection and engagement. 

The topics include: Letting God Lead, We Are More than Our Job Titles, Conflict Management in the Workplace, and Bring your Whole Self to Work

Participants will also receive lunch and refreshments and have to walk through our exhibitor tables and connect with other organizations that support Christian professionals in the workplace.  This will be an event you do not want to miss!  Click through to see the schedule, speaker bios and topic descriptions. 

Women, you can also register for our Women’s Leadership Institute Conference Gifted to Influence beginning Friday evening and receive a discount for participating in both events!

  • Christian business leaders share how to lead and influence in the secular workplace
  • 4 Ted Talk-style presentations with small and large group discussion
  • Admission to the WLI National Conference Exhibitor Hall
  • Buffet lunch and refreshments

Jesus Said So – Trusting When it Doesn’t Make Sense To

By Karen Lippert

Learn how to make sense of nonsensical situations by taking Peter’s lead when he obediently trusted Jesus despite it defying human logic …

One day as Jesus was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret, with the people crowding around him and listening to the word of God, he saw at the water’s edge two boats, left there by the fishermen, who were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little from shore. Then he sat down and taught the people from the boat. When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into deep water, and let down the nets for a catch.” Simon answered, “Master, we’ve worked hard all night and haven’t caught anything. But because you say so, I will let down the nets.” When they had done so, they caught such a large number of fish that their nets began to break. So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them, and they came and filled both boats so full that they began to sink. When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at Jesus’ knees and said, “Go away from me, Lord; I am a sinful man!” For he and all his companions were astonished at the catch of fish they had taken, and so were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, Simon’s partners. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Don’t be afraid; from now on you will catch men.” So they pulled their boats up on shore, left everything and followed him. (Luke 5:1-11)

Jesus knew the physics of sound traveling over the water, so He used Peter’s boat to teach the large crowd that day.  We know that Peter was about done working for the day.  He was washing his nets and probably thinking about going home to get some much needed rest.  After Jesus had finished teaching, He asked Peter to go to deeper water and get his nets dirty.  REALLY?  I think that the equivalent for us would be:  You’ve just finished cooking, eating, and cleaning up your dinner.  You have washed the pots and pans and have loaded the dishwasher.  Then Jesus says to you,  “Make me supper.”  How would you react?

Look at Peter’s answer in v.5.  First of all, Peter calls Jesus, “Master.”  He knew that Jesus was an important person; One Who taught with authority.  (By the way, have you acknowledged Jesus as “Master” of your life today?)  Then he was honest.  They had worked all night and had struck out.  NO FISH.  There isn’t anything much worse than working for hours with no tangible result!  My guess that is Peter only made money when he had fish to sell!

I absolutely LOVE the next part: “but, because YOU say so, I will let down the nets.”  Have you used that line with your kids, “Do it because I said so!”  Well, Peter was acting with childlike obedience in this situation.  HE let down the nets and the result was incredible:  so many fish that two boats began to sink!  Peter then saw Who Jesus really was and starting following Jesus as a full-time disciple. (walking away from a fortune, by the way!)

Is Jesus asking you to do something that doesn’t make sense?  This definitely didn’t make sense to Peter:  a good fisherman didn’t fish in the middle of the day, in deep water.

What is your nonsensical situation?  Do you have to trust Him with a health scare?  Do you have to trust Him in a marriage that isn’t what you dreamt of?  Do you have to trust Him in a job that is stressful and demanding?  Do you have to trust Him with finances that don’t add up?

No matter what situation you might be in, Jesus wants you to respond with trusting obedience.  Keep praying.  Keep reading His Word.  Keep coming to worship.  Keep serving.    He will prove Himself faithful!  He has a good plan for your life!


Karen Lippert is the Director of Women’s Ministry at Divine Redeemer in Hartland, WI.

Learn From the Experts: Leading a Bible Study: Part 2

This is part 2 of learning from the experts on leading a Bible study. The experts are Donna Streufert, founder of the Women’s Leadership Institute and Deb Burma, author of the Bible study, Living a Chocolate Life (CPH)

To access Part 1 of this series, click here.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO PREPARE FOR LEADING A BIBLE STUDY?

Donna: Here are my steps for preparation:

  • Spend time in fervent prayer.
  • Work through the lesson as I expect group members to do.
  • Be open to new insights God is teaching me through this lesson.
  • Refer to the Leader’s Guide and/or commentaries or other resources to extend my understanding.
  • Review or draw out the Central Truth and the objectives of this lesson. Consider printing these out for participants.
  • Think through how I will use the time allotted for the session.
  • Consider using a story, personal experience or object to catch attention as we begin the lesson.
  • Plan for prayer and/or singing to close the lesson.

Deb: I prepare for each study with a read-through of the session and the Bible passages, often pausing to do a little research on the Scripture text, with the help of my Study Bible notes or other trusted sources. Then I go through the session and Scriptures again, this time more thoroughly, answering the questions myself as a participant would. If a video is included with the study, I view it once or twice, making notes to apply to group discussion while viewing it. Finally, I read over the session’s questions again and consider alternate or additional questions that may be especially relevant to our group and its unique needs. Throughout my preparation, I pray for God’s guidance, for humility and grace in leadership, and for clear direction.

For some studies, I prepare a fun activity as an opener or ice breaker. I may prepare simple props or handouts or provide a take-home idea to encourage the women to apply the lesson to life. (For example, a Scripture card with the theme verse that each participant can post in a prominent place for aid in memorization or a note card and envelope, so each can send a word of encouragement to someone outside the study.)

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER IN LEADING?

Donna: The Holy Spirit is the teacher/leader. I am a tool. God is the one who changes hearts and lives. I am no more important than each member of this group. I don’t have all the answers. I am a learner, too. God is working in my heart and life just as he is in the other members of the group. We are all members of Christ’s body.

Deb: I think one of the most important things I need to remember is that I’m still learning too and I should humbly communicate that to those whom I’m leading. I need to remember that every woman in the room matters, and so does her input. I also need to remember not to be so hard on myself as a leader. By God’s grace, I’m able to communicate the saving love of Christ to every participant as I share His Word and trust that He works through me, by the power of the Holy Spirit, despite my shortcomings and mistakes.

HOW DO YOU HELP GROUP MEMBERS FEEL COMFORTABLE IN SHARING? 

Donna: The blessings of group Bible study include a closer, more supportive relationship among members of God’s family. As trust grows, participants are free to open their hearts to one another. Some are more comfortable with sharing than others. Early on, I make a point of stating clearly that what we share of our personal lives remains confidential. I ask the group if they can agree to that. I may remind them later, also.

Sometimes I model the openness I want to foster by telling parts of my own story, my own spiritual journey, my personal experiences.

Shy or reserved people may simply need “permission” to talk about themselves. In this case I might say: “Betty, you’ve been through something similar. Would you be comfortable sharing your thoughts with us?” Often, this is all that’s needed.

Deb: I encourage women to share by sharing openly myself. I often begin with lighter lead-in discussion questions that break the ice, enabling women to feel comfortable with one another. I think it’s vitally important to affirm, encourage, and thank each woman when she does share, helping her to see that she has something of value to offer that others may gain from, and communicating that I care about what she has to say. I’m amazed at how quickly women begin to feel comfortable in sharing when others, including their leader, are courageously doing so. I’m often amazed at the insight a new participant brings to the table, as we discuss a given passage or topic that others (including myself!) wouldn’t have thought of. Our discussions are richer and deeper when group members become comfortable and begin to share. Relationships develop and trust grows as we grow together in the Word and grow in faith.

WHAT IS THE FUNNIEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOU AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER?

Deb: So many little fun and funny scenarios have happened during Bible study over the years, and I’ve been able to laugh at myself as I’ve admitted my own foibles while making a point in the midst of a study, which often serves to further remind others of God’s amazing grace in Christ! Once I boldly recited an entire passage, only to look up and find forty women staring quizzically at me because I had shared the correct chapter and verses, but was reading from the wrong Book of the Bible. (How could I have not realized my mistake when I’d prepared the lesson?!)

HOW HAS LEADING BIBLE STUDIES CHANGED YOU?

Donna: I am changed as the Holy Spirit works through God’s Word among God’s people. I am a learner first.

I grow through the witness, insights, wisdom and Christian life styles of my friends and fellow believers in group Bible study.

I have discovered my God-given gifts of teaching and leading. And this is a good thing. All thanks and glory to God.

Deb: We often hear people say that the teacher learns even more than the students in the preparation and process of teaching. I believe this to be true in the specific educational area of leading Bible studies! I’ve grown in my desire to seek greater depth and detail from the Word of God as a result of my opportunities to lead others in study. In preparation, I delve in more deeply than I might if I was studying on my own, knowing that I’ll be sharing with others and they’ll likely take away more from the study if I’m a good steward with my preparation time as a leader; God may use my enthusiasm and passion for the study of His Word to ignite a fire in others to do likewise.

Leading Bible studies has also opened my eyes to recognize that while I’m digging in, learning, and leading, I have SO MUCH MORE to learn; there are so many ways in which I desire to grow. I am humbled to learn how often a participant knows more than I do on a given subject and I’m thrilled to learn from her! I am humbled by my own shortcomings and limitations, but trust that the Holy Spirit works through every Word of Scripture and in the hearts of His people as we continue to learn together.

Many thanks to Donna and Deb for sharing their insights gleaned from years of leading Bible studies! Their experience in choosing materials, leading discussions, and handling tricky situations is invaluable.

We pray that you will grow in faith and trust as you develop your ability to lead others in God’s Word. May all the participants be blessed through your leadership.

For more great articles like the one you just read, explore the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

Learn From the Experts: Leading a Bible Study: Part 1

A BIBLE STUDY can be enjoyable and exciting. But it can also be complicated and challenging. To help leaders, both new and experienced, we asked two seasoned experts on how they handle this leadership role.

Donna Streufert is the founder of Women’s Leadership Institute. She is the wife of Pastor Dan Streufert and a champion of women who seek to fulfill their God-given roles in the church. Doing the math, she discovered she has fifty years of experience in leading Bible Studies!

Deb Burma is also a pastor’s wife, serving with her husband Cory, in Columbus, Nebraska. Author of Stepping Out, A Chocolate Life, Treasured, and Beautiful Feet, she blogs at debburma.blogspot.com. Deb is also a ministry leader and frequent speaker to women’s groups.

WHAT CONCERNED YOU MOST AS YOU BEGAN TO LEAD BIBLE STUDIES? 

Donna Streufert: Thinking back to the very first group, mentally scanning all those that followed, I realized that what I wanted most of all was this: that participants would experience personally the excitement, joy, comfort and assurance that comes when connecting with God through His powerful Word.

I had been blessed this way. I wanted this blessing for others.

Deb Burma: Many Bible study leaders say their greatest concern is that they won’t be able to adequately answer difficult questions from the participants. Thankfully, I was blessed with the guidance of mentors who told me that it’s okay when a leader doesn’t have all the answers. It’s more important to listen to the questions with genuine interest and care, acknowledge when you don’t know an answer, and provide reassurance that you will try to find the answer. Then seek answers through research—asking the pastor or another trusted source for assistance in finding them. But on a related note, I DID find myself fearful that my attempts to explain a difficult text or answer questions of a complex or personal nature would be misunderstood and may even cause a woman to leave the session distraught or confused.

I’ve worked through these fears with prayer and preparation, and by beginning each Bible study series addressing the possibility that issues like this may arise, and opening the door for open and honest discussion that may include clarification during the study or one-on-one conversation afterward.

HOW HAS YOUR STYLE OR APPROACH AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER CHANGED OVER THE YEARS?

Donna: Every group has a personality. It’s important to know your group, understand the individuals and see how they function as one. Love them. Flexibility required.

So, my style or approach flexes to meet the personality of the group. For example, some groups are no nonsense and detail oriented, some are full of questions and challenges, some are at ease with one another and laugh easily. (Yes, laughing in Bible class is allowed.)

Time and place and group size also affect my style and approach. A group of several hundred or more requires a more deductive style (teaching or lecturing.) Small groups, under ten members or so, do well with an inductive approach (participants read, think, search and arrive at their own conclusions.)

Deb: Over the years, I think I’ve become more relaxed in my teaching style in both large- and small-group settings, seeking to find a balance between completing a lesson in one session and allowing more time for discussion. (It all depends on size of group and time constraints.)

I’m learning that it’s okay to challenge women, especially as they’ve become invested in the group over time, and encourage them to complete between-sessions assignments, while also being careful to communicate that it’s okay to arrive without preparation. (I wouldn’t want a woman to stop attending because she struggles to keep up with the reading or homework.)

I’ve also learned more about the variety of people’s learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and reading/writing). To engage different kinds of learners, I use video clips, handouts, object lessons, visual aids like maps or props, take-home projects, discussion starters, and so on, depending on the study topic and the group’s dynamics.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU EXPERIENCED AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER?

Donna: Two challenges come to mind – numbers and materials. Sometimes these challenges arise. Other times these are not challenges at all.

For example, with numbers: Sometimes it is difficult to attract people to spend time together in God’s Word. Apathy and indifference and lifestyle choices appear to keep numbers low. The times when attendance in Bible classes soar are more encouraging and exciting. But either way, I try to remind myself that I’m not in control. Prayer, personal invitation, careful preparation are my responsibility and my privilege. The rest is God’s Word, God’s people, God’s work.

The second challenge is finding just the right material for the group I’m leading. If I know my group well, I will look for materials

  • with sound biblical content
  • that truly engage learners
  • that meet their needs
  • that are appropriate for the age group and life experiences of the group
  • and have a workable format.

Sometimes I find a perfect match for a group. Sometimes it’s more of a challenge. I may need to shorten or adjust or even replace one study with another. But, that’s OK. I’ve learned something helpful for the future.

Deb: My biggest challenges in leading Bible studies have been situations when a participant has boldly declared a statement that is clearly off-base or not Biblically accurate. How do I respond in such a situation? While I never want to embarrass a woman with a confrontational correction in front of everyone, I also need to very gently bring the group back to Scripture and make sure others are not confused or misled by her declaration. I prayerfully consider how to respond to this woman one-on-one. Similarly, when a participant attempts to dominate the discussion or take the group on an unrelated bunny trail, it’s essential (though a challenge, for sure!) to gently manage the discussion, giving others equal opportunity for input and quickly bringing the group back on track.

An equally big, but very different, challenge is the already-crowded schedules of all potential participants. While seeking to grow women’s ministry by inviting and involving a vast variety of ages of women in every stage of life, it’s increasingly difficult to find times for Bible studies that work. I’ve found that providing two time options for the same large-group study on the same day is very helpful! That way, a woman can choose a noon time study or an evening study, or to alternate. Also, offering varying lengths of series enables women to commit to a timeframe that they’re comfortable with. As an example, instead of agreeing to attend a Bible study every week for a year, a woman may sign up for an 8-week series and then decide if she can commit to the next one. I’ve seen so many women give Bible study a try for the first time when given this opportunity!

Click here to read Part 2 of this article!

For more great articles like the one you just read, explore the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

How to Influence Others Without Saying A Word: A Skill-Building Drama about Mary of Bethany

MARY OF BETHANY: A WOMAN OF INFLUENCE
By Donna J. Streufert

LEADERSHIP IS INFLUENCE. Exemplary leadership is influence worthy of being imitated. Throughout Scripture we can find stunning examples of exemplary leadership. One example in the New Testament reveals a woman who speaks not one word, yet by the power of the Spirit and God’s gift of faith, displays exemplary leadership.

That woman is Mary of Bethany.

PRESENTING MARY’S STORY IN A NEW WAY
One way to access the message of Mary’s example is simply to read the biblical account. Yet God gifts us with our senses so we might absorb the message in a variety of ways. The arts, music, drama, dance, for example, reach our hearts and minds on several levels. WLI offers a resource using dramatic speech, pantomime, enactment to convey the story of Mary’s exemplary Christian leadership.

This dramatic resource presents two short scenes in the New Testament where Jesus is with Mary of Bethany. Other actors in the scenes are the onlookers. They have something to say, too. And they have much to learn. Think of this
presentation as a readers’ theater where a Greek Chorus tells the story with the help of a couple of other characters. The chorus guides the narrative, explains what’s happening, and adds information.

This resource WLI offers might be used as part of the program at a women’s meeting, retreat, or conference, or as a chancel drama for an entire congregation. It is important that the presentation be followed by thoughtful discussion.

The link below will take you to the narrator’s introduction, the dramatic script, and questions to use for group discussion.

LEAD BY INFLUENCE
We have our Lord’s blessing to learn, grow and step out to influence attitudes about women’s service in the church. The main point of this resource is this: Women lead by influence and Jesus approves. Jesus’ seal of approval links action to text and memory. 

Blessings on your commitment to lead others to Christ through exemplary Christian leadership.

Click here for Skill Building Drama about Mary of Bethany

About the author: Donna Streufert is a teacher and writer. Beginning in 1969, she wrote religion curriculum and adult Bible studies for Concordia Publishing House, including four LifeLight studies. Currently, she writes for Creative Communications for the Parish in Fenton, Missouri. In 2003, Donna and her husband Daniel founded the Women’s Leadership Institute at Concordia University Wisconsin, where she taught as an adjunct instructor in education for five years and served on the Board of Regents for twelve years.

For more great articles like the one you just read, explore the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.