Testimonial

Attending WLI Workshops gave Katelyn Schneider Confidence to Lead Nursing Home Ministry Program

Katelyn Schneider

As I reflect on the last three years of my college experience and growing leadership skills, I feel the culmination of many small teaching moments have been molding my character little by little to form a steadfast servant for Christ. Servant leadership is a concept I’ve immensely matured in since freshman year and I can honestly say intentionally living my life for others continues to transform my heart every day. Even though I have a busy schedule, the various roles I am able to participate in rarely feel like work and it has been refreshing to watch God shine through the acts of service my peers and myself complete. I never imagined heading into my senior year I would be given such unique opportunities to serve God and live out my vocation!

Leading nursing home ministry taught me how to communicate better with others, plan events to meet multiple requests or suggestions, and exercise a new level of leadership autonomy that was unfamiliar to me.  Even on evenings when I would have rather done homework instead of going to the nursing home, God never failed to prove me wrong that it was worth my time to visit the residents. The residents’ sweet smiles, witty comments, and wisdom of enduring the highs and lows of life taught me something new each week. I frequently left feeling as if they had served me more than I had served them. The residents and the nursing staff often remarked how much they looked forward to our weekly visits and that we visibly brightened their day.

Besides what I began experiencing sophomore year with Nursing Home Ministry, I am blessed to witness the outcomes of my services in my other roles as well. I’ve seen two homes be built with Habitat for Humanity, homeless people fed on the streets of Milwaukee with Street Team, and the glow on audience members faces after performing touching music with the Wind Ensemble. Nursing school has not been an easy feat academically so when I have the chance to encourage some of the younger, struggling students through my SI position I feel honored to be the tool God chooses to work through in small non-formal conversations. Receiving appreciation e-mails from the students and seeing them develop the confidence to in turn help teach their fellow peers who need help has been an extremely rewarding part of the job.

Outside of holding direct leadership positions, I think my character has developed simply from being able to quietly watch, learn, and put into practice the enriching examples of what it is like to be a Godly, professional, and extremely compassionate woman that has been modeled by Concordia’s staff and faculty.  My list of role model women who “I want to be like someday” continues to grow. I am so thankful for the ways God has placed specific people in my life throughout college who have made this campus feel like home and keep me actively pursuing God, even when it is difficult. I owe many of my gained leadership qualities to those women.

Additionally, as God has opened my heart to servant leadership, He has reassured me that my quieter sometimes shy demeanor is not a character flaw but rather the way God designed me to uniquely serve Him alone. My yelling voice may not carry across an entire room, but my heart screams for Jesus and I try my best to convey his love to everyone who crosses my path. I have learned to value the more quiet confidence He granted me and I look forward to meeting the people God continues to write into the story of my everyday life. So, even if I am not at a specific service event, I now appreciate the service of the simple yet significant act of knowing someone’s name, giving them a little smile in the hallway, and conveying to them that they are loved by God.

Looking to the future, I intend to continue developing as a servant leader by first, being aware of what opportunities God calls me to while taking time to seek out those in need of hearing the Gospel message. I did not develop my current leadership skills overnight and know that I still have a lot of growing to do. I am far from perfect. I am attempting to be more diligent about spending time in God’s word and hope He will reveal more to me through scripture. As I begin my CMLT presidency I plan to continue participating in WLI workshops and have loved the speakers I’ve heard this year including the confident leader workshop. I have been blessed on this leadership journey so far and trust God will only continue to work things for good if I remain faithful to Him.


Learn more about WLI and all we have to offer by exploring the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK,  INSTAGRAM, and  TWITTER.

WLI Helps Tori Homann Grow In Life and Leadership Skills

TORI HOMANN

I was initially introduced to WLI in 2011 when I came up for the last day of the national conference to participate in worship via liturgical dance with my mom, sister and some other ladies from my church. I don’t remember very much from that experience, other than that I thought it was an amazing opportunity to get to share the Lord through dance – an art form that I love.

My second experience was at the national conference in 2014. The theme for the event was Christ-Connected Women with the theme verse being Hebrews 10:24 which says, “Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works.” A friend of mine and I were blessed to be asked to speak about how the women attending the conference could relate to and foster relationships with younger women of our generation. I was so honored that women who were so much wiser and learned than me would want to sit down and listen to what I had to say. This was a humbling experience, but more than anything it was a learning experience. I was surrounded by SO MANY amazing women leaders. This is my favorite part of WLI: it brings the best female leaders in the Lutheran Church together in one place so that all can learn and grow from their experiences there at the conference and from the experiences of other women and speakers.

My most recent experience with WLI was receiving the call to be a member of the WLI marketing committee to assist with the Twitter and Facebook accounts (the username for both accounts is @wlicuw so check out our pages for upcoming events and other wonderful, encouraging content!). I have already learned a lot, just from listening to the other women discuss how the marketing committee plays into WLI’s bigger picture of educating, encouraging, and equipping women leaders for Christ. I know that in my time on the board I will gain valuable life skills and continue to grow in leadership.

I think Paul sums it up best in his letter to Philippi. He says “I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now. And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ” (Phil. 1:3-6). This is what WLI has been for me. The work that this group is doing is truly Kingdom work. God is working in amazing ways through this organization: touching lives and bringing gifts to fruition that many women never even knew they possessed.

Tori Homann

Hope College 2020

Marketing Committee Board Member

Trish Kagerbauer Enjoys WLI National Conferences

Trish Kagerbauer

I’ve been to all of the National Conferences and have really enjoyed them. This group of ladies…as much as we enjoy chocolate and flowers and the occasional cocktail…likes our “meaty” Christian leadership and training as well!


Learn more about WLI and all we have to offer by exploring the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

Attending a WLI Conference Created a Networking Opportunity for Emily Marciniak

Emily Marciniak

I attended my first WLI conference in September 2015 at Concordia University Ann Arbor. I wasn’t too familiar with WLI at that time so I did not know what to expect. The conference ended up being more than I could have ever wanted, I had the opportunity to hear from speakers of all ages dealing with issues that I face everyday, I met some incredible mentors, and shared fellowship with other conference goers.

Then, I was asked to serve WLI as a website developer for the new WLI website. It has has been a tremendous learning experience and networking opportunity. I am thankful to have served in this capacity and to have helped such a worthy organization.


Learn more about WLI and all we have to offer by exploring the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

WLI Has Greatly Influenced the Life and Faith of Martha Fritz

MARTHA FRITZ

I have attended two WLI conferences, one at Concordia University Wisconsin, and another at Concordia University Ann Arbor. Initially I was asked to take photos at the conference at CUW, but I ended up attending sessions as well. When I heard that a group of women from CUW was going to the conference at CUAA, I jumped on board right away.

The sessions that I have attended at WLI conferences have greatly influenced my life and faith. I have taken away so much from each session and leave hungry for more. I have been inspired by the women who have led sessions and I feel that their words are coming straight from the Lord for my heart. Being surrounded by women of all ages from all over the country has been uplifting. I have been engaged in long, deep conversations with women I did not even know before the conference. WLI has given me hope and encouragement as I continue to live as a Christian woman. I am grateful for the community and fellowship that WLI has provided for me.


Learn more about WLI and all we have to offer by exploring the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

Learn From the Experts: Leading a Bible Study: Part 2

This is part 2 of learning from the experts on leading a Bible study. The experts are Donna Streufert, founder of the Women’s Leadership Institute and Deb Burma, author of the Bible study, Living a Chocolate Life (CPH)

To access Part 1 of this series, click here.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO PREPARE FOR LEADING A BIBLE STUDY?

Donna: Here are my steps for preparation:

  • Spend time in fervent prayer.
  • Work through the lesson as I expect group members to do.
  • Be open to new insights God is teaching me through this lesson.
  • Refer to the Leader’s Guide and/or commentaries or other resources to extend my understanding.
  • Review or draw out the Central Truth and the objectives of this lesson. Consider printing these out for participants.
  • Think through how I will use the time allotted for the session.
  • Consider using a story, personal experience or object to catch attention as we begin the lesson.
  • Plan for prayer and/or singing to close the lesson.

Deb: I prepare for each study with a read-through of the session and the Bible passages, often pausing to do a little research on the Scripture text, with the help of my Study Bible notes or other trusted sources. Then I go through the session and Scriptures again, this time more thoroughly, answering the questions myself as a participant would. If a video is included with the study, I view it once or twice, making notes to apply to group discussion while viewing it. Finally, I read over the session’s questions again and consider alternate or additional questions that may be especially relevant to our group and its unique needs. Throughout my preparation, I pray for God’s guidance, for humility and grace in leadership, and for clear direction.

For some studies, I prepare a fun activity as an opener or ice breaker. I may prepare simple props or handouts or provide a take-home idea to encourage the women to apply the lesson to life. (For example, a Scripture card with the theme verse that each participant can post in a prominent place for aid in memorization or a note card and envelope, so each can send a word of encouragement to someone outside the study.)

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER IN LEADING?

Donna: The Holy Spirit is the teacher/leader. I am a tool. God is the one who changes hearts and lives. I am no more important than each member of this group. I don’t have all the answers. I am a learner, too. God is working in my heart and life just as he is in the other members of the group. We are all members of Christ’s body.

Deb: I think one of the most important things I need to remember is that I’m still learning too and I should humbly communicate that to those whom I’m leading. I need to remember that every woman in the room matters, and so does her input. I also need to remember not to be so hard on myself as a leader. By God’s grace, I’m able to communicate the saving love of Christ to every participant as I share His Word and trust that He works through me, by the power of the Holy Spirit, despite my shortcomings and mistakes.

HOW DO YOU HELP GROUP MEMBERS FEEL COMFORTABLE IN SHARING? 

Donna: The blessings of group Bible study include a closer, more supportive relationship among members of God’s family. As trust grows, participants are free to open their hearts to one another. Some are more comfortable with sharing than others. Early on, I make a point of stating clearly that what we share of our personal lives remains confidential. I ask the group if they can agree to that. I may remind them later, also.

Sometimes I model the openness I want to foster by telling parts of my own story, my own spiritual journey, my personal experiences.

Shy or reserved people may simply need “permission” to talk about themselves. In this case I might say: “Betty, you’ve been through something similar. Would you be comfortable sharing your thoughts with us?” Often, this is all that’s needed.

Deb: I encourage women to share by sharing openly myself. I often begin with lighter lead-in discussion questions that break the ice, enabling women to feel comfortable with one another. I think it’s vitally important to affirm, encourage, and thank each woman when she does share, helping her to see that she has something of value to offer that others may gain from, and communicating that I care about what she has to say. I’m amazed at how quickly women begin to feel comfortable in sharing when others, including their leader, are courageously doing so. I’m often amazed at the insight a new participant brings to the table, as we discuss a given passage or topic that others (including myself!) wouldn’t have thought of. Our discussions are richer and deeper when group members become comfortable and begin to share. Relationships develop and trust grows as we grow together in the Word and grow in faith.

WHAT IS THE FUNNIEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOU AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER?

Deb: So many little fun and funny scenarios have happened during Bible study over the years, and I’ve been able to laugh at myself as I’ve admitted my own foibles while making a point in the midst of a study, which often serves to further remind others of God’s amazing grace in Christ! Once I boldly recited an entire passage, only to look up and find forty women staring quizzically at me because I had shared the correct chapter and verses, but was reading from the wrong Book of the Bible. (How could I have not realized my mistake when I’d prepared the lesson?!)

HOW HAS LEADING BIBLE STUDIES CHANGED YOU?

Donna: I am changed as the Holy Spirit works through God’s Word among God’s people. I am a learner first.

I grow through the witness, insights, wisdom and Christian life styles of my friends and fellow believers in group Bible study.

I have discovered my God-given gifts of teaching and leading. And this is a good thing. All thanks and glory to God.

Deb: We often hear people say that the teacher learns even more than the students in the preparation and process of teaching. I believe this to be true in the specific educational area of leading Bible studies! I’ve grown in my desire to seek greater depth and detail from the Word of God as a result of my opportunities to lead others in study. In preparation, I delve in more deeply than I might if I was studying on my own, knowing that I’ll be sharing with others and they’ll likely take away more from the study if I’m a good steward with my preparation time as a leader; God may use my enthusiasm and passion for the study of His Word to ignite a fire in others to do likewise.

Leading Bible studies has also opened my eyes to recognize that while I’m digging in, learning, and leading, I have SO MUCH MORE to learn; there are so many ways in which I desire to grow. I am humbled to learn how often a participant knows more than I do on a given subject and I’m thrilled to learn from her! I am humbled by my own shortcomings and limitations, but trust that the Holy Spirit works through every Word of Scripture and in the hearts of His people as we continue to learn together.

Many thanks to Donna and Deb for sharing their insights gleaned from years of leading Bible studies! Their experience in choosing materials, leading discussions, and handling tricky situations is invaluable.

We pray that you will grow in faith and trust as you develop your ability to lead others in God’s Word. May all the participants be blessed through your leadership.

For more great articles like the one you just read, explore the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

Learn From the Experts: Leading a Bible Study: Part 1

A BIBLE STUDY can be enjoyable and exciting. But it can also be complicated and challenging. To help leaders, both new and experienced, we asked two seasoned experts on how they handle this leadership role.

Donna Streufert is the founder of Women’s Leadership Institute. She is the wife of Pastor Dan Streufert and a champion of women who seek to fulfill their God-given roles in the church. Doing the math, she discovered she has fifty years of experience in leading Bible Studies!

Deb Burma is also a pastor’s wife, serving with her husband Cory, in Columbus, Nebraska. Author of Stepping Out, A Chocolate Life, Treasured, and Beautiful Feet, she blogs at debburma.blogspot.com. Deb is also a ministry leader and frequent speaker to women’s groups.

WHAT CONCERNED YOU MOST AS YOU BEGAN TO LEAD BIBLE STUDIES? 

Donna Streufert: Thinking back to the very first group, mentally scanning all those that followed, I realized that what I wanted most of all was this: that participants would experience personally the excitement, joy, comfort and assurance that comes when connecting with God through His powerful Word.

I had been blessed this way. I wanted this blessing for others.

Deb Burma: Many Bible study leaders say their greatest concern is that they won’t be able to adequately answer difficult questions from the participants. Thankfully, I was blessed with the guidance of mentors who told me that it’s okay when a leader doesn’t have all the answers. It’s more important to listen to the questions with genuine interest and care, acknowledge when you don’t know an answer, and provide reassurance that you will try to find the answer. Then seek answers through research—asking the pastor or another trusted source for assistance in finding them. But on a related note, I DID find myself fearful that my attempts to explain a difficult text or answer questions of a complex or personal nature would be misunderstood and may even cause a woman to leave the session distraught or confused.

I’ve worked through these fears with prayer and preparation, and by beginning each Bible study series addressing the possibility that issues like this may arise, and opening the door for open and honest discussion that may include clarification during the study or one-on-one conversation afterward.

HOW HAS YOUR STYLE OR APPROACH AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER CHANGED OVER THE YEARS?

Donna: Every group has a personality. It’s important to know your group, understand the individuals and see how they function as one. Love them. Flexibility required.

So, my style or approach flexes to meet the personality of the group. For example, some groups are no nonsense and detail oriented, some are full of questions and challenges, some are at ease with one another and laugh easily. (Yes, laughing in Bible class is allowed.)

Time and place and group size also affect my style and approach. A group of several hundred or more requires a more deductive style (teaching or lecturing.) Small groups, under ten members or so, do well with an inductive approach (participants read, think, search and arrive at their own conclusions.)

Deb: Over the years, I think I’ve become more relaxed in my teaching style in both large- and small-group settings, seeking to find a balance between completing a lesson in one session and allowing more time for discussion. (It all depends on size of group and time constraints.)

I’m learning that it’s okay to challenge women, especially as they’ve become invested in the group over time, and encourage them to complete between-sessions assignments, while also being careful to communicate that it’s okay to arrive without preparation. (I wouldn’t want a woman to stop attending because she struggles to keep up with the reading or homework.)

I’ve also learned more about the variety of people’s learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and reading/writing). To engage different kinds of learners, I use video clips, handouts, object lessons, visual aids like maps or props, take-home projects, discussion starters, and so on, depending on the study topic and the group’s dynamics.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU EXPERIENCED AS A BIBLE STUDY LEADER?

Donna: Two challenges come to mind – numbers and materials. Sometimes these challenges arise. Other times these are not challenges at all.

For example, with numbers: Sometimes it is difficult to attract people to spend time together in God’s Word. Apathy and indifference and lifestyle choices appear to keep numbers low. The times when attendance in Bible classes soar are more encouraging and exciting. But either way, I try to remind myself that I’m not in control. Prayer, personal invitation, careful preparation are my responsibility and my privilege. The rest is God’s Word, God’s people, God’s work.

The second challenge is finding just the right material for the group I’m leading. If I know my group well, I will look for materials

  • with sound biblical content
  • that truly engage learners
  • that meet their needs
  • that are appropriate for the age group and life experiences of the group
  • and have a workable format.

Sometimes I find a perfect match for a group. Sometimes it’s more of a challenge. I may need to shorten or adjust or even replace one study with another. But, that’s OK. I’ve learned something helpful for the future.

Deb: My biggest challenges in leading Bible studies have been situations when a participant has boldly declared a statement that is clearly off-base or not Biblically accurate. How do I respond in such a situation? While I never want to embarrass a woman with a confrontational correction in front of everyone, I also need to very gently bring the group back to Scripture and make sure others are not confused or misled by her declaration. I prayerfully consider how to respond to this woman one-on-one. Similarly, when a participant attempts to dominate the discussion or take the group on an unrelated bunny trail, it’s essential (though a challenge, for sure!) to gently manage the discussion, giving others equal opportunity for input and quickly bringing the group back on track.

An equally big, but very different, challenge is the already-crowded schedules of all potential participants. While seeking to grow women’s ministry by inviting and involving a vast variety of ages of women in every stage of life, it’s increasingly difficult to find times for Bible studies that work. I’ve found that providing two time options for the same large-group study on the same day is very helpful! That way, a woman can choose a noon time study or an evening study, or to alternate. Also, offering varying lengths of series enables women to commit to a timeframe that they’re comfortable with. As an example, instead of agreeing to attend a Bible study every week for a year, a woman may sign up for an 8-week series and then decide if she can commit to the next one. I’ve seen so many women give Bible study a try for the first time when given this opportunity!

Click here to read Part 2 of this article!

For more great articles like the one you just read, explore the EQUIP page of our website. Get inspired to lead by reading through the ENCOURAGE page, then visit one of our campus EVENTS near you. Stay connected by following us on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.